FREEDOM AND FRAGMENTATION: IMAGES OF DECOLONISATION AND PARTITION FROM THE CENTRE OF SOUTH ASIAN STUDIES ARCHIVE

1 August to 27 October 2017

Exhibition reception 25 August at 4pm

To recognise and commemorate the many meanings of freedom in South Asia in 1947, the Centre of South Asian Studies is holding the first ever public exhibition of its collections. Seventy years on we look back to reflect on the lead-up to and the consequences of independence, partition, and decolonisation. The Centre of South Asian Studies has a unique archive of photographs, maps and films. Across the four floors of the Alison Richard Building, the exhibition will have on display some of the highlights of its collections, most of which are being shown publicly for the first time. These images illustrate the diversity of anti-colonial struggles and independence movements, as well as depict British rule in the twilight of empire.

Please join the Vice-Chancellor, Sir Leszek Borysiewicz, and the Centre’s Committee of Management in launching the exhibition on Friday, 25 August at 4pm. Drinks and snacks will be served.

The exhibition is part of the University of Cambridge Museums ‘India Unboxed’ programme.


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Edgelands

8 June – 28 July 2017
Exhibition opening event on 8 June 2017, from 6 – 8PM

Edgelands presents the work of six visual artists who explore and document the wastelands and the neglected environs to be found on the margins of urban living. Housing estates, out of town retail parks and industrial areas, these spaces are the great ‘unnamed and ignored landscapes…places where our slipstream has created a zone of inattention’  and yet where all manner of interest and beauty thrive.

Day Bowman
Dan Coombs
Marguerite Horner
Barbara Howey
Lee Maelzer
Sean Williams

Opening event programme

6.00PM

The exhibition opening starts with a dance performance by LKR & Co (London), choreographed by Lizzi Kew Ross and featuring eight students from Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance. The dancers explore the modern glass spaces in and around the atrium area of the Alison Richard Building and echo the works by artists from the Contemporary British Painting Group. The haunting sounds of a solo viola accompanies the dance with a composition by Michael Berkeley.

7.00 – 8.00PM

‘In Conversation’ evening with Iain Sinclair and Nick Papadimitriou. Sinclair and Papadimitriou, writers on the wastelands and edgelands of Britain, will be talking about their work, followed by a Q&A. This event is free, but booking is recommended.

Iain Sinclair is best known for his book London Orbital, an account of his walking and exploring the terrain close by the M25. Iain is a prolific writer of both fiction and non-fiction and has presented a number of films for TV and cinema.

Nick Papadimitriou’s exploratory walks led him to coin the phrase ‘Deep Topography’, an amalgam of writing and observation. His much-acclaimed Scarp is a survey of the northern edges of London. Nick is the subject fo John Roger’s film The London Perambulator.

Complementing Solitude

An exhibition by Julia Ball & Loukas Morley

3 April – 26 May 2017

Private View 6 April2017,  5.30 – 8PM

An exhibition of works by two Cambridge artists from different generations, approaching colour, material and abstraction in contrasting ways. This exhibition aims to span these differences and to create interesting visual conversations in the spaces of the Alison Richard Building.

Julia Ball was born in Devon in 1930. She trained at Reading University as a printmaker and has lived in Cambridge since the early 1960s. The East Anglian coast has influenced her work with its spectacular space, light and colour. Agnes Martin and Winifred Nicholson have also both been influential in her work. Julia is represented in the Kettle’s Yard as well as the New Hall art collections.

Loukas Morley studied photography and cinematography at college; the multiple layers found in his paintings bearing reference to the layering of narratives, colour, compilation and framing. He is spare and precise in his work; his paintings are like traces of a performance that took place in his studio. The materiality of paint and its physical relationship with the body, enable him to choreograph compositions that are the tangible placements of his mark making. Loukas is currently artist in residence at Christs College, University of Cambridge.

Call for Submissions – ‘Artificial Things’ Photography Exhibition

We have teamed up with photography organisation Shutter Hub, and are excited to announce the call out for submissions for ‘Artificial Things’, a photography exhibition taking place in the Alison Richard Building from November 2017 to January 2018.

There will always be a question over the photographic image as to whether it can ever truly capture reality, but with ‘Artificial Things’ we’d like to explore that idea further, to bring together photographic artists who use photography to explore and merge the boundaries of the fake and the real.

This exhibition will endeavour to bring together contemporary photography that reaches across the medium into alternative and historical processes and stretches the format of photography to its very edges whilst broadly investigating the theme of ‘Artificial Things’.

The deadline for submissions is 5pm on Monday 04 September 2017.

Further details can be found on the Shutterhub Blog.

Discovery through Display

Kettle’s Yard at the Alison Richard Building

23 JANUARY – 24 MARCH 2017

Kettle's Yard - Discovery Through DisplayDisplays that take inspiration from the juxtaposition of art works and objects in the Kettle’s Yard House, will occupy the Alison Richard Building. When Jim Ede created Kettle’s Yard in 1957, he arranged artworks, found objects and furniture in ways that simultaneously responded to, and influenced, the viewer’s movement around the spaces – challenging conventional experiences of viewing art in galleries. These conventions will be further tested by installing artworks and objects from the Kettle’s Yard Collection within the dynamic, multifunctional spaces of the Alison Richard Building.

Curated by Josephine Waugh, 2nd Year Undergraduate Student, History of Art, University of Cambridge

Exploring the Display: Free Talk

A free talk by Josephine Waugh accompanies the exhibition and will take place on the 1st of February at 5pm in the Alison Richard Building.

Kettle’s Yard

David Kefford – Pocket Sculptures

21 November 2016 – 13 January 2017
Private View Tuesday 22 November 2016, 5.30 – 7.30pm

David Kefford’s sculptures are part of an ongoing project entitled ‘pocket sculptures’.  The project involves a process of gathering small items of waste material (ordinary bits and bobs, which other people have discarded) on routine walks. These are then taken back to his studio where they are assembled/modeled/arranged through an intuitive and improvised process – finger exercises.

Kefford’s work often engages, through simple actions and playful gestures, with human-related objects and materials in a particular space and time. Much of it is site-generated, contingent and fragile, which reflects his interest in the awkward and precarious status of his artistic persona and related objects used to stage an event. The sculptural work is mutable, temporal, uses un-monumental materials, and is made in connection with, and to, his own body. He liberates and subverts common objects, materials and found images from the everyday environment and transforms these into new sculptural scenarios that suggest elusive, emotional and psychological narratives.

He is interested in the intersection between the private making process and a public outcome and how these can potentially coalesce through a ‘live(d)’ experience.  His practice continually seeks new physical spaces, media space or the space between bodies and events for production and presentation and how they are affected by new spatial conditions. It is the role of improvised play in the act of making sculpture within a social context that best embodies Kefford’s practice – a fluid process of continual becoming, a ‘cause and effect’ of performative actions.

David Kefford (b. 1972) is an artist based in Cambridge UK. He graduated from the MA Fine Art course at the University of Brighton in 1999, is alumni of Wysing Arts Centre and co-founder of artist-led initiative Aid & Abet. Kefford’s work has been extensively exhibited and commissioned in the UK and internationally. He has been the recipient of several prizes and awards and his work is held in a number of private collections.

www.davidkefford.com

Radical/Basic/Actual

1970s Experiments in Print Media

Felipe Ehrenberg, Latin American Artists and the Beau Geste Press

10 October – 14 November 2016

In Association with Cambridge University Library and Trinity College

Curator: Erica Segre

The Mexican mixed media, conceptual and performance artist Felipe Ehrenberg and Martha Hellion co-founded the Beau Geste Press collective in Devon (1970-1976) with English artist and art historian David Mayor. It became one of the most influential avant-garde independent presses of the post-war period and is regarded by art historians and contemporary artists as one of the most significant transnational collaborative projects of the 1970s.

This exhibition showcases a collection of these provocative and original limited editions often made using unconventional materials and ‘arte povera’ techniques of production and distribution in an unusual variety of small-scale formats. It explores the legacy of indiscipline of the BGP’s uniquely communal and discrepant artefacts.

Flowers of Earth and Blood

Lala Meredith-Vula

3 October – 23 December 2016

Lala Meredith-Vula is showing a series of photographs that mark her personal journey of rediscovering her roots and her own identity during the past 25years, including the aftermath of war in Bosnia and Kosovo. Lala will also feature works from the blood feud reconciliation movement in Kosova from 1990 – 1991 and the incredible time in the Kosovar history when people decided to bring an end to blood feuds and to stop the killing which lasted for over a hundred years and sometimes until all men of the two involved families were killed. The blood feuds were often influenced by the fifteenth-century canon of Lek Dukagjini, a set of traditional Albanian laws.

Lala Meredith-Vula was born in Sarajevo in 1966, to an Albanian father and English mother, and came to Britain in the 1970s. She studied Fine Art at Goldsmiths’ College, London University (1985/88) and was awarded a Yugoslav scholarship at Pristina University, Kosova (1988/90). Her first show was in Damien Hirst’s landmark exhibition “Freeze”, London (1988) that is famous for launching the YBA Young British Artists. She has exhibited at the Venice Biennale (1999 and 2007) representing Albania, as well as nationally and internationally with many solo shows including at the Photographers’ Gallery London, in Germany, Italy, Albania, and in numerous group shows in the UK, USA, and China.

Bond steel NATO BASE 2006
Bond steel NATO BASE 2006

This exhibition is accompanied by the Festival of Ideas symposium Politics through the Archives of Photography, Film and Art which takes place on 22 October 2016 from 2-3pm in the Alison Richard Building.